An Alternate Universalist Quote of the Day

Rev. Dan Harper, at his blog Yet Another Unitarian Universalist, has today posted a Universalist responsive reading that he adapted from Rev. Isaac Case Knowlton’s essay “The Angry God,” published in Through the Shadows (1885): 44-45.  It is a creative re-use of historic words from our heritage.  Whereas the Universalist quotes posted daily on Transient and Permanent are meant to be given in the form that the author presented them, as historical documents (though of course also potentially inspirational and enlightening), in trimming and rearranging sections of the text Rev. Harper offers them in a new liturgical fashion that may be useful to modern-day Unitarian-Universalists.

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3 responses to “An Alternate Universalist Quote of the Day

  1. >Whereas the Universalist quotes posted daily on >Transient and Permanent are meant to be given in >the form that the author presented them

    except that in the originals, this isnt the way the quoted author presented them. The ones I’ve found are quoted correctly, except that they are just a few lines from much larger works. Hanson, the editor of the collection, did several books like this.

  2. Transient and Permanent

    Well, to clarify, the quotes this year from Hanson are correct in the context of Voices of the Faith, which is itself a historical document. But mostly I was thinking of the pre-2009 quotes which are taken from various documents. It’s true that they are only a portion of a larger work, and that very occasionally I excerpted things with ellipses, but in general they were the best I could do with limited time and space. I don’t change the punctuation, spelling, word order, italicization, or anything else, and for that tiny minority of readers who might care about the larger context, I always give full citation with page number if at all possible. Of course, for the current year where I’m working with Hanson, all you need to do is look up the date on which I posted the quote to know where it falls in his book–but that doesn’t resolve the fact that he himself doesn’t provide good citations. Ah, the joys of working with archival materials.

  3. Dan

    Glad you like the I. C. Knowlton reading!

    Universalist history trivia: I. C. Knowlton’s son was Hosea Knowlton, a prominent Massachusetts lawyer who wound up as the prosecutor in the Lizzie Borden trial. Hosea K. remained a Universalist all his life.

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